Adjustment of Status Representation

Rabinowitz & Rabinowitz, P.C. of Dallas and Frisco Texas has represented countless individuals in adjustment of status filings and interviews over our many decades of immigration law practice. Whether drafting the application and documenting the legal bases to support an applicant’s eligibility to adjust status, or helping to reduce applicant anxiety during a government interview, we have greatly enjoyed the process including being present with our clients at the moment their lawful permanent resident status is granted. It is generally a client’s moment of a simultaneous sigh of relief and an exclamation of excitement at having become a Green Card holder at last.

Adjustment of status is a discretionary benefit that allows some individuals applying for immigrant status to process their cases to conclusion in the U.S., rather than processing their cases to conclusion at a U.S. consular post abroad. The legal ability to process an immigrant visa case to conclusion in the U.S. can represent a savings in the expenses that would otherwise be required to travel abroad, as well as a way to avoid loss of work time and separation from family members during overseas immigrant visa processing.

In order to file to adjust status in the U.S. to that of a lawful permanent resident, the individual must be eligible to receive an immigrant visa and an immigrant visa must be immediately available at the time of filing of the application.

Some persons are not eligible for adjustment of status. Some of those not eligible include persons who entered the U.S. without inspection, certain individuals who have been employed in the U.S. without authorization, and certain individuals who have fallen out of lawful nonimmigrant status otherwise required as a basis for adjustment. There are many other conditions on eligibility, restricted classes, ineligible classes, and exceptions to some of the impediments to adjustment. A thorough analysis of eligibility is critical.

Adjustment of status applicants can be accompanied and represented by attorneys during the interview process. This can be especially helpful to those persons with eligibility factors that require briefing and advocacy to prove basic eligibility, and for those persons for whom a greater degree of personal comfort would result from having an attorney present to respond to any legal questions the immigration officer might raise during the interview at the USCIS Field Office.